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What is the Next Holiday After 4th of July?

What is the Next Holiday After 4th of July?

Americans love holidays. After all, who can say no to a day off work? The Fourth of July, in particular, is a holiday Americans look forward to. From fireworks and picnics to backyard games and barbecues, there are plenty of ways to celebrate Independence Day and have fun in the summer sun.

Unfortunately, there’s always a bit of a comedown after a fun holiday like the Fourth of July, and many of us find ourselves eagerly anticipating another day to relax and unwind. So, what is the next holiday after 4th of July, and why is it important? Read on to learn more.

What holiday follows the 4th of July?

Labor Day is the next federal holiday after the Fourth of July. This special day is dedicated to the achievements and contributions of American workers in all industries. It’s typically observed on the first Monday in September, serving as an unofficial marker for the end of summer. Many Americans mark the occasion with parades, parties, athletic events and other festivities, celebrating an extra day away from work.

Origins of Labor Day

The Labor Day holiday was created by the labor movement in the late 19th century. As the celebrations grew in popularity, Congress made Labor Day a federal holiday in 1894. Labor Day grew out of one of the country’s most dismal chapters in terms of labor and working conditions. In the late 1800s, as the Industrial Revolution changed the way of work for people around the globe, the average worker in the United States worked a 12-hour day, seven days per week, just to earn a basic living. Even children as young as five and six toiled in factories, mines and mills in the U.S., earning just a fraction of what adults earned.

Workers began to rebel against these harsh, unsafe working conditions, with the very poor and recent immigrants to the country being most affected. Often, workers had insufficient access to fresh air, breaks or sanitary facilities at their jobs. To combat these poor conditions, labor unions, which had first appeared in the late 18th century, became a more prominent force in American politics. Unions began to organize rallies and strikes to push for better working conditions and higher pay.

Violence was not uncommon at these events, with the 1886 Haymarket Riot in Chicago being one of the deadliest. Other events gave rise to longstanding traditions—namely taking the day off work. For example, on September 5, 1882, 10,000 workers marched from City Hall to Union Square in New York City, marking the first Labor Day parade in American history.

Who created Labor Day?

As unrest related to labor spread throughout the country, Congress wanted to repair ties with American workers. To this end, Congress passed legislation to make Labor Day a federal holiday. President Grover Cleveland signed the act into law on June 28, 1894. The true founder of Labor Day is actually unknown, even more than a century after the holiday’s adoption. Some believe Peter J. McGuire, cofounder of the American Federation of Labor, suggested the Labor Day holiday. Others suggest that Matthew Maguire first proposed the holiday while serving as secretary of the Central Labor Union.

Today’s Labor Day celebrations

Like Independence Day, Labor Day is a holiday that’s marked by parades, picnics, barbecues, fireworks displays and other fun, festive activities. For kids and young adults, Labor Day marks the unofficial end of summer, as school gets back in session and fall approaches. It’s a day to relax and forget about the stresses of work while appreciating all the contributions the American worker makes to society as a whole. Take advantage of the day and get together with friends and family for a day off!

Both the 4th of July and Labor Day are important federal holidays Americans look forward to celebrating each year. Looking for patriotic apparel to wear to a 4th of July picnic or Labor Day get-together? Show off your love for our country with Julu 4th t-shirts and accessories from The Flag Shirt. From hats and tank tops to pants and sunglasses, you’ll find everything you need to show off your patriotic flair on these special days and all throughout the year.

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